I Have Always Been An Existential Migrant

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IMG_0101As a long-term expat, people always ask me “why?”: “why did you leave the United States?”, “why did you move to the Czech Republic?”, “why did you move to Argentina?”, “why do you study so many languages?”, “why don’t you want to return to the United States?”.

Now, on my 10th anniversary of being an expat, I feel very fortunate to finally be able to answer those questions. The answer is simple, yet complicated: I am an existential migrant, and always have been.

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Interview with “Existential Migrant” Emily Miller of urbanexpats.com by journalism students at the University of Nevada, Reno

Click here to read the interview on Reynolds Sandbox, “showcasing innovative and engaging multimedia storytelling by students at the Reynolds School of Journalism at the University of Nevada, Reno”

“MediaTips: Emily Miller, an ‘Existential Migrant’

In our latest in a series on Media Tips, Dalyn Cooke catches up with Emily Miller, an American journalist living in Argentina who also works as a Spanish-English translator and blogs at Urban Expats.”

View story at Medium.com

 

 

Interview with Emily Miller of urbanexpats.com on the Road Dust Podcast

Click here to listen to the interview with Emily about life in Argentina and existential migration on Road Dust Podcast.

“Episode 6 – The existential and practical aspects of living abroad in Argentina – with Emily Miller

Emily is sharing her incredible life journey. Originally from Vermont, she lives in Argentina since 2008. We talk about many daily aspects of life in Buenos Aires, such as food, healthcare, education, music – as well as about existential topics, such as what makes people move across the world.”

Emily_Guitar.jpg

 

 

How to get a “monotributo” and bank account in Argentina

If you’re looking to work as a legit local freelancer in Argentina so that you can provide companies and individuals with invoices for your services, you’ll need a taxpayer ID as a “monotributista” and a local bank account where they can send you payments.

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HOW TO GET YOUR MONOTRIBUTO

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Why do so many expats seem to have entrepreneurialism in their blood?

Written by Ajay Yadav

Founder and CEO of Roomi

Source: http://www.forbes.com/sites/under30network/2016/06/03/why-the-expat-experience-makes-for-good-entrepreneurs/#35f7fd4231c3

“As an “expat-preneur” who moved to the U.S. from India twelve years ago and founded three companies, I believe my own personal experience may shed some light on this question.

To begin with, immigrating to a new country means starting from scratch: learning an entirely new language, separating from loved ones, figuring out how to navigate an unfamiliar culture and re-establishing the basics, including shelter, employment, health insurance, and community.

And therein lies the secret: starting a new business carries many of the same challenges as uprooting your life and moving to a new country. Entrepreneurs need to learn the new “language” of business and finance, navigate the cultural nuances of commerce, industry, and effective networking, and separate themselves from the crowd in order to seek out new endeavors. In short, both experiences require peak levels of resourcefulness and a persevering spirit to power through non-stop challenges and new territories.”

WORD.

Dating & Relationships When You Live Abroad Part 2: BUENOS AIRES

Oh those Porteños: spontaneous, clever, expressive, social, never boring, and sexy as hell with an accent straight from the heavens. But at what price? Chamuyo, histeriqueo, machismo, flakiness, lying, cheating, and drama. What you need to know about dating in Buenos Aires.

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Experience the Call to Prayer in Istanbul and Marrakech (Videos)

I was recently in Marrakech and Istanbul, two cities where you can hear the Islamic call to worship. 

In many countries, Adhan (in Arabic) or Ezan (in Turkish) is the call to prayer that is recited 5 times throughout each day in order to summon muslims for mandatory worship. This practice is intended to reach as many people as possible, which is why microphones and loudspeakers are utilized. The Muezzin is the person chosen for this task, based on his talent at reciting the Adhan beautifully, melodically and loudly. It is one of the most important duties in the mosque.

What are they saying? That there is no strength or power except from God. That there is no God but Allah. That Muhammad is the messenger of Allah.

The first time I heard it I was in Marrakech. I just stopped and stood still and listened. It was a truly beautiful thing. After a week in Marrakech and a week in Istanbul I can honestly say that I never tired of hearing it. In Istanbul, it sounded like a beautiful song.

My favorite part? How the different Muezzins at the different mosques seemed to be speaking to each other. You would hear it coming from one mosque, then suddenly realize it was coming from another, then another, then back to the first mosque.

Experience it for yourself.

IN ISTANBUL:

 

 

IN MARRAKECH:

 

 

“EAT SLEEP SPANISH REPEAT”: How I Became Bilingual

multilingual-456774_960_720First of all, I want to explain the difference between being “bilingual” and “fluent”, in my opinion. “Fluency” is subjective and mainly refers to your ability to communicate well, even if you make mistakes or have a foreign accent. “Bilingual” means that you speak it as well as your native language. So, how long did it take me to get to the point where I speak Spanish as well as I speak English? Oh, about 20 years. Everyone is different, so I can only comment on my own process, but based on my own experience, here’s my formula for becoming bilingual:

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